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A Humble, yet Powerful, Rendition of the National Anthem

John Williams National Anthem

We’re all familiar with John Williams, perhaps one of the most celebrated composers of our day. For its 200th anniversary, In July of 2014 for the Annual 4th of July Celebration in Washington DC John Williams arranged and conducts a humble but incredibly powerful arrangement of the Nation’s National Anthem.

John Williams is conducting the National Symphony Orchestra, the U.S. Army Herald Trumpets, the Joint Armed Forces Chorus and the Choral Arts Society of Washington.

Cover tiny file
look inside
The Star Spangled Banner – 200th Anniversary Edition
The Star Spangled Banner – 200th Anniversary Edition The Star Spangled Banner – 200th Anniversary Edition The Star Spangled Banner – 200th Anniversary Edition The Star Spangled Banner – 200th Anniversary Edition The Star Spangled Banner – 200th Anniversary Edition The Star Spangled Banner – 200th Anniversary Edition (Chorus and Orchestra (opt. Fanfare Trumpets and Narrator) Deluxe Score). Arranged by John Williams. For Full Orchestra. John Williams Signature Edition Orchestra. 16 pages. Published by Hal Leonard (HL.4491485). Performance time – ca. 3:45

Full set includes 40 choral octavos; additional octavos also available separately (HL00129856). Performance time – ca. 3:45

Full set includes 40 choral octavos; additional octavos also available separately (HL00129856). Performance time – ca. 3:45

Full set includes 40 choral octavos; additional octavos also available separately (HL00129856). Performance time – ca. 3:45

Full set includes 40 choral octavos; additional octavos also available separately (HL00129856). Performance time – ca. 3:45

Full set includes 40 choral octavos; additional octavos also available separately (HL00129856). Performance time – ca. 3:45

Full set includes 40 choral octavos; additional octavos also available separately (HL00129856).

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Cameron Carpenter- Killing Me Loudly:

Cameron Carpenter gave a presentation a few years back at the University of Michigan titled “Killing Me Loudly: On the Abdication of the “King” of Instruments”, which discusses the organ. Although some organists may not appreciate his comments regarding the organ, he makes a number of valid points on the stereotypes that are generally associated with the organ.

Cameron’s speech begins around 8:54 and is around 30 minutes long. After the speech, Cameron gives some demonstrations on his more recent works and how he transcribes various classical piano pieces to the organ. Once you listen to his speech, write your thoughts and comments below. I’m curious to know what your thoughts are.